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Police Arrest 9 For Importing Prohibited Drugs In Ashanti Region   
 
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08-Jul-2017  
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The Ashanti Regional Police Drug Law Enforcement Unit and officials from the Food and Drug Authority (FDA) in Kumasi have arrested two traders for importing prohibited drugs at French-line near Alarbar, a suburb of Kumasi.

The suspects are Margaret Mensah, 25, alias Akua and Samira Abdul-Kadir, 30 years, all Ghanaians.

The Public Relation Officer (PRO) for Ashanti Regional Police Command ASP Juliana Obeng briefing the media said an inspection in their shops revealed quantities of assorted drugs and when examined by the officials from the FDA, they were found not to be registered drugs.

Some of the prohibited drugs found in their shops were Tramadol 222miligram, “Ibuglo plus”, “Davegra 150”, “Vargra Extra150”, “Black Cobra 150” and other liquids in plastic bottles locally called “Awonche” which in Hausa language means “wash your heart” with some others labeled in Chinese language.

According to ASP Juliana Obeng, an initial investigation into their business activities on Monday, July 3, 2017, led to the arrest of seven persons.

They are Abubakari Osman 20 years, Abubakari Ibrahim 24 years, Mohamadu Mansour 18 years, Adamu Seidu 22 years, Mahamadu Ibrahim Nurudeen 22 years and Abdul-Salam Abubakari 30 years all Nigerians.

When interrogated, they mentioned the former as their source of supply of their source of supply of the prohibited drugs.

All suspects are in a police custody to assist in investigations, whilst the drugs are been sent for forensic analysis.
 
 
Source: kasapa
 
 

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