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Media Warned Against Excesses After Supreme Court Verdict
 
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09-Sep-2013  
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Following the declaration of the Supreme Court verdict on the 2012 presidential petition, media excesses seems to be on the rise in some newspapers and at times on the air waves.

Some of the headlines have no relationship and meaning to the content of the stories.

Radio Ghana sought the views of elderly statesmen and stakeholders on the development.

First, a former MP, P.C. Appiah Ofori. He said it is regrettable that intellectuals who should know better are those involved in this conduct of fabrication of stories.

He said it is not healthy for the country's democracy. On the possibility of Nana Akufo Addo still contesting the 2016 general election, Mr. Appiah Ofori said he was among the first to state that there should be no change in leadership.

He insisted that there is no limit to age in the constitution to bar the 2012 NPP Flagbearer from contesting the next election.

He asked party supporters to stop the scramble otherwise, they risk dividing the party.

The former MP said those who are calling on the Supreme Court Judges to return immediately from the U.S. to come and listen to criticisms of their judgement are not justified.

He said the judges are on their statutory vacation.

The President of the GJA, Affail Monney, has appealed to media practitioners not to lower standards but endeavour to uphold the ethics of the profession which he described as intrinsic.

Mr. Monney said lowering of standards would result in the loss of respect and confidence by the public.
 
 
 
Source: GBC
 
 

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