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Victoria Hammah Keeps Crying...   
 
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12-Nov-2013  
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It Appears former Deputy Minister of Communications, Victoria Hammah, has shown remorse over her action as she has been engaged in uncontrollable weeping ever since her leaked gossip tape, which has been christened ‘Vikileaks’, emerged.

Chiefs from her hometown, Kintampo in the Brong Ahafo Region, yesterday confirmed to Daily Guide that they had found it very difficult to talk to the former minister because anytime they tried to speak to her she would break into uncontrollable weeping.

The Kintampo Kyeremankomahene, Nana Guakro Effah, who is also Nkoranzahene’s Kronkonhene, has therefore appealed to President John Mahama to reconsider the outright dismissal slapped on the former deputy minister and reinstate her to her former post.

Sources told Daily Guide that the embattled former minister had just been introduced to the chiefs of the area by the First Lady, Lordina Mahama as the next NDC parliamentary candidate and that she should be accepted when she comes around, thus leaving the turbulent Ablekuma West seat to Ursula Owusu.

This occurred when Mrs Mahama travelled to the area with Vicky only to return to face the gargantuan embarrassment.

With the new development, Ms Hammah’s political career has taken a nose-dive.

Nana Guakro Effah described the sanction meted out to their royal as very harsh since the allegations were not properly investigated before the President took the decision to dismiss her.

The Kyeremankomahene has also appealed to the President to institute a committee to look into the leaked tape in order to give opportunity to the sacked deputy minister to clear herself. This, he said, would help establish the veracity or otherwise of the claims on the said tape.

He disclosed that chiefs from the area were planning to meet with President Mahama to put their concerns to him to ensure the reinstatement of Ms Victoria Hammah as the government looked into the matter.

The leaked tape contained several allegations including a claim that the Minister of Gender, Children and Social Protection, Nana Oye Lithur, played a role in the election petition which saw President John Mahama being maintained as the validly elected President in the 2012 presidential election.

Ms. Hammah was sacked barely 24 hours last Friday by the President, after the tape went viral, without being officially communicated to. She only checked her email and found a correspondence relieving her of her appointment.

On the said tape, Ms. Hammah was heard telling someone believed to be her aunt that she wanted to make not less than $1million before quitting politics.

Until then, the sacked deputy minister said she would play her game safe without having issues with any of her superiors in order to achieve her ambition, since “if you have money then you can control people.”

The 32-minute recording of the two ladies contained inside information about the workings of government and the role Nana Oye Lithur played in securing a favourable judgement for the NDC in the election petition.

Meanwhile, the largest opposition party, the NPP, whose leaders went to the Supreme Court to challenge the 2012 election results, is asking the Chief Justice, Georgina Theodora Wood, to probe the judgement which dismissed the petition.

Other civil society organisations have also joined the fray calling on the CJ to launch full-scale independent investigations into the revelations made on the leaked tape to save the image of the Judiciary, especially the justices of the apex court of the land.

 
 
Source: Fred Tettey Alarti-Amoako, Sunyani/D-Guide
 
 

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